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The Mauser Bolt Handle

A Different Approach

Page 3

 

After drilling the 1/4-inch hole, the bolt is installed in the action and the 1/4- inch Grade 8 bolt is tried. With the rifle bolt closed tightly, the Grade 8 bolt should slide easily through the drilled hole in the rifle bolt, if not, find out the cause of the binding and deal with it.

Above we have the bolt body and the Grade 8 bolt laid up, ready to solder. The threads have been removed from the Grade * bolt, and a slight sweeping bend has been made (the bend is hard to see, but it sweeps up and back). I have a heat sink in the bolt body, but wet paper towels will work just as well.

This photo Ý Ý Ý shows the Grade 8 bolt cut to length and a plastic knob ready to be AcraGlased to it. The rifle bolt handle has been cut and some grinding has been done.

This is what it looks like; I need to do a little better job on the stub.

It clears the scope well.

From above.

And behind.

The 1/4-inch Grade 8 bolt and two styles of knobs are for sale here.

The Grade 8 "bolt" is incredibly strong and I don't think I could bend it without some help, say a wrench or pipe. The bolt handle "might" accept a 5/16 bolt, thatís what I used on the M-N, but I didn't feel comfortable, not enough metal in the bolt stub. You could thread the drilled hole in the stub, but I think that would be weaker, as the "root" of the thread would be weaker than the shank of the Grade 8 bolt. Most (all ?) Allen style, socket head bolts are Grade 8, I think, so they could be used as "stock". I went with a bolt rather than rod, as the bolts are more common and the "hardness" is just right. For a knob, you could use the old knob, a plastic "glass eye", a souvenir 8-Ball, or use your imagination.

Thatís It !

And here is a Swede M96.

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